Research Archive

Zolov as Guest on “Fresh Outlook” to Discuss US-Cuban Relations

Eric Zolov appeared as a guest specialist on the cable news program, “Fresh Outlook,” to discuss the removal of Cuba from the U.S. State Department’s list of sponsors of international terrorism.

Zolov on Fresh Outlook

Humanities Institute Event on 4/14/2015 featuring History Department Faculty

Humanities Institute at Stony Brook
Workshop on Gender and Religion
Tuesday, April 14
2:30 – 6:00 pm, Humanities 1008

2:30 – 4:00 Gender, Body, Religion in Modern Africa (Chair: Tracey Walters)
Christian Mobility, Muslim Invisibility: Bodies and Difference in Northern Nigeria
Shobana Shankar, Stony Brook University

Schooling, Spirit Possession, and the “Modern Girl” in Niger
Adeline Masquelier, Tulane University

 4:00 – 4:30 Coffee Break

 4:30 – 6:00 Gender, Body, Religion in the Early Modern Mediterranean (Chair: Sara Lipton)
Help-Mates and Soul Mates: Trans(sexual)migration of Souls in Sixteenth–Century Kabbalah
Joshua Teplitsky, Stony Brook University

Curating the Body in Francisco Delicado’s Retrato de la Lozana Andaluza
Israel Burshatin, Haverford College

 6:00 – 6:30 Comments and General Discussion

 6:30 – 7:00 Reception

Co-sponsored by the Department of History and the Center for the Study of Jewish, Christian, Muslim Relations
download poster here

 

Doctoral Student wins Fulbright

Congratulations to Stony Brook History Department PhD student Erica Mukherjee, who has been awarded a Fulbright-Nehru Fellowship for 2015-16. The grant will support 9 months of research in India on her dissertation project, “The Real and Imagined Environments of the Colonial Indian Railways.”

Zolov on Cuba reforms in HuffPo

The recent announcement of diplomatic relations with Cuba inspired Prof. Eric Zolov to pen an op-ed, “Let’s Revisit Helms-Burton,” which appeared in the Huffington Post series “90 Miles: Rethinking the Future of U.S.-Cuban Relations.”

HIS 517: Mobilities & Connections [Graduate Theme Seminar] (Spring 2015)

This seminar examines expanding circuits of global mobility from the early modern period to the present, and considers methodological implications of taking mobilities and connections as object of analysis. We will examine historical processes and dynamics on multiple scales from the perspective of people, commodities, and ideas in motion, along with dynamic networks and material or cultural effects these circuits generate; and the regulatory systems that emerge in consequence of increasingly robust flows. Expanding global connections and their effects produce new constraints and open a wide range of fresh possibilities for both states and diverse groups of people. The course will look closely at the interplay between unprecedented mobility and the restrictions imposed by modern political regimes, and the shifting relationship between people and real and imagined political entities from the global (empires, internationalisms, global governance bodies), to the provincial (kingdoms, nationalisms, nation-states). Organized thematically around mobile people, commodities, and ideas, and global institutions, we will examine disaporic migrant connections, global radical and anti-colonial movements, material and cultural effects of long-distance commodity production and exchange, and the circulation and expanding scope of institutional ideas and practices. The course will be interdisciplinary, incorporating comparative and monographic historical and anthropological studies, theoretical writings, and selections from literary or historical primary source texts; and transregional, examining particular themes via close consideration of Asia, Africa, and the Americas, and their interconnections. Readings will include books or articles by scholars such as Benedict Anderson, Sebouh Aslanian, Sven Beckert, Lauren Benton, Engseng Ho, Ilham Khuri-Makdisi, Mark Mazower, Adam McKeown, Jeremy Prestholdt, Maia Ramnath, and Sanjay Subrahmanyam (links above are to recommended or required books ordered for the course).

Climate March in Historical Perspective

Some of you may be interested in my recent blog entry on the People’s Climate March, which also seeks to place the climate movement in hist perspective: http://theenergycollective.com/chris-sellers/2151521/beyond-environmentalism-marching-toward-climatism