Admissions

Each year, we admit 10-12 students into the doctoral program. Applications for graduate admission are handled through the Graduate School.  All students must now apply online.  You may begin this process, and see instructions and other information about doing so, by clicking on the following:  apply online

If you have any questions about the process, please consult the information below, or for more detail, our page of “frequently asked questions”.   Also feel free to call or email us with further questions, either the Graduate School office itself (631/632-4723), or our History Department Graduate Coordinator (Ms. Roxanne Fernandez, (631/ 632-7490), or our Director of Graduate Studies (Shirely Lim).

Completed Doctoral program applications for admission and financial assistance, along with all required supporting material, must be postmarked/submitted/received by January 9th (click here for further information on financial aid). Students are admitted only in the spring for study beginning in the fall. Students are admitted for part-time study, though we have found that a high percentage of students who pursue doctoral study on a part-time basis do not complete the program.

Completed Master’s program applications for admission and all supplemental materials, must be postmarked/submitted/received by April 1st for Fall admission or November 1st for Spring admission to our two-track master’s program.

We expect all applicants to have at least a bachelor’s degree in history or a degree in a closely related field with a substantial amount of coursework in history and a strong record of undergraduate achievement. In special cases, students who do not have a bachelor’s degree in history or whose GPA does not meet the requirements stated above may be admitted on a provisional basis for M.A. study only.

Applicants are also required to submit scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The History subject test is not required. It is advisable, especially for financial aid applicants, to take the GRE no later than October to insure that the review of application materials is not delayed. Applicants may also wish to include photocopies of GRE score report (in addition to having the official score reported to the University).

Students whose first language is not English must submit scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Admissions decisions are based primarily upon the admissions committee’s estimation of the student’s potential for scholarly achievement and the ability of the Stony Brook faculty to support the student in his or her intended field of scholarly study. These decisions are based upon:

· the applicant’s undergraduate record
· letters of recommendation that describe the applicant’s achievements and potential for intellectual growth,
· a sample of written work (such as a research paper submitted for an undergraduate class or a master’s thesis)    that illustrates the applicant’s capacity for research, analysis, creative thought, and writing skills, and
· GRE Scores
· a statement of purpose describing the intended field of study, the insights or experiences that lay behind the  decision to specialize in this area, and the kinds of questions which the applicant hopes to explore. This        statement should be as specific as possible, and applicants are encouraged to contact the professor(s) with  whom they hope to work before submitting the application.

Graduate News

SBU students rock the SSRC

Congratulations to both Ashley Black and Andrew Ehrinpreis for being awarded fellowships from the Social Science Research Council (SSRC). Black has won the prestigious Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship for her research on Mexico City as a site of Latin American exile in the 1950s. Ehrinpreis has won a Drugs, Security, and Democracy Fellowship (co-sponsored by the Soros Open Society Foundations) for his dissertation, “Constructing Coca: A History of Bolivian Coca Nationalism and the War on Drugs, 1920–2000.” Ehrinpreis is the third Stony Brook history student to win this prize.

PhD student wins national fellowship

Please join us in congratulating Gregory Rosenthal! The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded him the prestigious Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship for his project, “Hawaiians Who Left Hawaii: Work, Body, and Environment in the Pacific World, 1786–1876.” Mellon fellowships—of which only 65 were awarded this year—support advanced graduate students in humanities and social sciences in the their last year of dissertation writing.

Another SBU grad student wins fellowship

Congratulations to Ph.D. candidate Froylán Enciso! The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation (dedicated to studies of violence and violence prevention) has awarded him a dissertation fellowship for his project, “Made in Sinaloa: From the Regional to the Global History of the Mexican War on Drugs, 1909–1985.”

Language fellowship for SBU student

Erica Mukherjee (Ph.D. candidate) has just received a Cornell University Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) fellowship and will use it to study Bengali at the South Asia Summer Language Institute at the University of Wisconsin this summer. Congratulations!

Graduate student accomplishments

Later this spring, Ph.D. candidate Gregory Rosenthal will join eleven other scholars from across the country to participate in the Cornell University Institute for the Social Sciences’ 2013 Institute on Contested Landscapes. Gregory will be presenting a paper titled “The Property on/is their Backs: Dispossession and Wage Labor in Nineteenth-century Hawaiʻi.” Gregory has also received two dissertation research awards for this summer and fall: a Michael J. Connell Foundation Fellowship from the Huntington Library in San Marino, California; and an Arthur J. Quinn Memorial Fellowship at the Bancroft Library at UC-Berkeley.

Research fellowship winner

Raquel Otheguy (Ph.D. candidate) has just been awarded the National Academy of Education/Spencer Dissertation Fellowship for the 2013–2014 academic year. This highly competitive program aims to identify the most talented researchers conducting dissertation research related to education. Raquel’s dissertation fellowship project is (tentatively titled) “Education in Nation, Empire, and Diaspora: Afro-Cubans from 1878 to 1920.” Congratulations!