Honor Society

About Phi Alpha Theta

The international Honor Society in History, Phi Alpha Theta, was organized at the University of Arkansas on March 17, 1921. Since that time, it has grown to more than 740 chapters in 50 states and has more chapters than any other accreddited honor society in the world. The total number of initiates, since its inception, is more than 200,000. All students in accredited institutions who have completed 12 hours of history and are maintaining high standards in their college or university studies are eligible for membership. Phi Alpha Theta is a professional society whose purpose is to promote the study of history through the encouragement of research, good teaching, publication, and the exchange of learning and ideas among historians. It seeks to bring students, teachers, and writers of history together both intellectually and socially; and it encourages and assists historical research and publication by its members in a variety of ways.

How to Join

1) Be a history major or minor
2) Have 12 credits in history courses (transfers count)
3) Have a 3.0 cumulative GPA
4) Have a 3.1 History GPA

Each semester there will be an informational meeting, scheduled to suit both MWF and TuTh schedules. There will be an application deadline each semester.

At this meeting you can fill out an application and pay your fees of $60 ($40 one time lifetime membership in the national organization; $20 yearly for the local chapter). Checks may be made out to either Phi Alpha Theta or Wilbur R. Miller (faculty advisor and treasurer).

Please bring an unofficial transcript (you can get this from the SOLAR system).

Activities

We sponsor a book sale each semester.
We have field trips, such as to Ellis Island, Old Bethpage Village, Metropolitan Museum, Museum of broadcasting, Radio City Music Hall.

Our biggest event is building a boat for the Roth Pond Regatta, and competing in the race (we placed second in 2003).

We always have an end of the year dinner.

We do have some academic activities, especially helping to organize and participate in the Eureka sponsored student research conference

Also there are national fellowship opportunities and a chance to publish papers in the Phi Alpha Journal, The Historian.

AND, WE ARE ALWAYS LOOKING FOR MORE IDEAS AND ACTIVE MEMBERS!

Contact

Wilbur Miller

Office: SBS S325

Phone: 631-632-7487

Undergraduate News

Blog Entry on the Texas Fertilizer Plant Blast, in DISSENT

I’ve written an online blog entry for the journal Dissentthat may prove of interest.  The argument is based on those I and others made in our edited volume Dangerous Trade: Histories of Industrial Hazard across a Globalizing World (Temple UP, 2011).

“How Industrial Hazards Get Overlooked,” Dissent Blog (April 25, 2013)

Chris

 

Rethinking Energy Histories and Landscapes

The Departments of History and Technology and Society and the Humanities Institute

Stony Brook University

Present

Ann Green
Department of History and Sociology of Science

University of Pennsylvania

“Rethinking Energy Histories and Landscapes”

horses pulling plow

Current concerns over energy consumption and environmental consequence are creating growing scholarly interest in energy history, and especially in understanding the energy transitions of the past.   Changes in the kinds of energy consumed and in levels of energy consumption have long been central to an understanding of industrialization.   Yet the focus has been largely on wood, coal and oil, overlooking other forms of widely consumed energies.  This talk emphasizes the critical role of animal power in American industrialization, and reexamines how the question of transition away from animal power is understood in historical literature.
Monday, April 30, 2012
3:30 p.m. Humanities 1008

Ann Green is the author of, among many publications, “Horses at Work: Harnessing Power in Industrial America” (Harvard UP, 2008), winner of the 2009 Pioneer America Society Fred B. Kniffen Award for best book.

(URECA) Undergraduate Research & Creativity

History Department URECA Itinerary
April 25th at the SAC – Room 305 – Please stop by!

An annual event that showcases undergraduate research and is open to all SBU undergraduates conducting faculty-mentored research and creative projects.

HIS 396-K4: DIRTY & DANGEROUS WORK IN AMERICAN HISTORY (SUMMER 2012)

Summer Session I (May 29 – July 6)

TuTh 6:00-9:25

As featured in television shows like “Dirty Jobs” and “Deadliest Catch,” and in current news about clean-up workers exposed to toxic dust at Ground Zero, the interrelationships between work and environment are sometimes exciting, and sometimes downright dangerous and deadly. This is nothing new. Work environments have long been important sites of courage and risk, a stage for performing and proving one’s gender, racial, or national identity. Work environments have also been sites of cooperation and conflict between diverse peoples, and between people and non-human nature.

Child coal miners (1908)
Child Coal Miners (1908) (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

This course examines the relationships between work and environment in United States history from the colonial period to the present day, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will use books, articles, films, and students’ own real-world experiences with, and explorations of, work, to arrive at a common understanding of the place of work and environment in United States history. We will also seek to discover the parallels, if any, between the historical events and processes we study, and current issues in American society and politics. Students are expected to complete all readings, write two short papers, and produce a final project.

Summer 2012

Take History courses during the Summer . . . 3 credits in only 6 weeks!!
Courses for Summer 2012

Undergraduate Research & Creativity (URECA)

Undergraduate Research & Creativity (URECA)

April 25th at the SAC – Mark your calendars and plan to stop by!

An annual event that showcases undergraduate research and is open to all SBU undergraduates conducting faculty-mentored research and creative projects.